Intersections
In order to write the book you want to write, in the end you have to become the person you need to become to write that book.
Junot Diaz (via ficser-upper)
Justice is not a quantitative question. If you steal something for long enough it doesn’t become yours
Kwame Ture (formerly Stokely Carmichael) on settler colonialism (via decolonizehistory)
One year, I taught this (Sociological theory) class and only used female writers. The journals were written by women, the textbook was written by females. Do you know what kind of responses I got on my student evaluations that year? {…} That I was biased, that I was only looking from one point of view… that I was basically a man eater. That’s the kind of things I’d get from the students… The semester before, I used only male writers. Do you think I got any kind of feedback like that then?

"Not a single word."

Dr Rebecca Erikson, my professor, in her introduction of epistemology and challenging the main narrative

(via marloscruzin)

People assume that I was in the closet because I didn’t disclose that I was assigned male at birth. What people are really asking is ‘Why didn’t you correct people when they perceived you as a real woman?’ Frankly, I’m not responsible for other people’s perceptions and what they consider real or fake. We must abolish the entitlement that deludes us into believing we have the right to make assumptions about people’s identities and project those assumptions onto their gender and bodies.

It is not a woman’s duty to disclose she’s trans to every person she meets. This is not safe for a myriad of reasons. We must shift the burden of coming out from trans women, and accusing them of hiding or lying, and focus on why it is unsafe for women to be trans.
Janet Mock, Redefining Realness. (via queerbookclub)
ethiopienne:

Support Trans Women of Color Collective

TWOCC was established almost one year ago after the brutal murder of Islan Nettles, a black trans woman in New York City. Since then we have brought visibility to this case and uplifted the narratives of struggle and resilience from our communities. From our multiple appearances at conferences, to our various talks, and our numerous accountability sessions we have created a new space for trans women of color leadership in the movement.We are an organizing collective, NOT a registered non-profit. We rely on grassroots fundraising to sustain the work. Trans women of color have historically — and continue to — put our bodies on the line for justice. The amount of unpaid emotional, physical, and psychological labor we do for our movements is astronomical. We are tired of the lip service that our allies give to trans women of color issues. We believe that the role of allies in our movement is to fund us so that we can do the work for ourselves! This is a fundraising campaign lead by allies to support our work. We need YOUR change, to make our own!

ethiopienne:

Support Trans Women of Color Collective

TWOCC was established almost one year ago after the brutal murder of Islan Nettles, a black trans woman in New York City. Since then we have brought visibility to this case and uplifted the narratives of struggle and resilience from our communities. From our multiple appearances at conferences, to our various talks, and our numerous accountability sessions we have created a new space for trans women of color leadership in the movement.

We are an organizing collective, NOT a registered non-profit. We rely on grassroots fundraising to sustain the work. Trans women of color have historically — and continue to — put our bodies on the line for justice. The amount of unpaid emotional, physical, and psychological labor we do for our movements is astronomical. We are tired of the lip service that our allies give to trans women of color issues. We believe that the role of allies in our movement is to fund us so that we can do the work for ourselves! This is a fundraising campaign lead by allies to support our work. We need YOUR change, to make our own!

nigerianostalgia:

Elaborate headdress worn by a woman in Nigeria. ca, 1960.

nigerianostalgia:

Elaborate headdress worn by a woman in Nigeria. ca, 1960.

I will bleed for better reasons this year.
Y.Z, An eight word resolution  (via thvgboi)
neoafrican:

When I read the story of Jada, so many emotions took hold of me. Anger, disgust, frustration, and sadness…Once again, a young Black girl’s body had been violated in the worst of ways. Even worse, her assault went viral on social media. Her assault went viral (the fact that the words assault and viral are being used in the same sentence makes me view humanity with a new level of disgust). Jada is fighting against her attackers and she is reclaiming her narrative and body.
Rape culture is real. Sexual violence is real. Gender-based violence is real. The continuing legacy of sexual brutalization of Black girls and Black women in this country is real. The sooner we acknowledge these truths, the sooner we can begin to dismantle the systems that continue to perpetuate rape culture.
She is fighting. The least we can do is stand by her and fight with her.
#IAmJada #StandWithJada

neoafrican:

When I read the story of Jada, so many emotions took hold of me. Anger, disgust, frustration, and sadness…Once again, a young Black girl’s body had been violated in the worst of ways. Even worse, her assault went viral on social media. Her assault went viral (the fact that the words assault and viral are being used in the same sentence makes me view humanity with a new level of disgust). Jada is fighting against her attackers and she is reclaiming her narrative and body.

Rape culture is real. Sexual violence is real. Gender-based violence is real. The continuing legacy of sexual brutalization of Black girls and Black women in this country is real. The sooner we acknowledge these truths, the sooner we can begin to dismantle the systems that continue to perpetuate rape culture.

She is fighting. The least we can do is stand by her and fight with her.

#IAmJada #StandWithJada

livelaughlovelocs:

fuckyeahmythologicalbeasts:

African Spirits I & II, by Ricardo Chávez-Méndez 

Wow wow wow

64,000
That’s how many black women are currently missing in America — but the media doesn’t seem to care (via theuppitynegras)