Intersections
sonofbaldwin:

The shade of it all. LOL!

sonofbaldwin:

The shade of it all. LOL!

marcalcock:

Camps Bay
South Africa

marcalcock:

Camps Bay

South Africa

marcalcock:

Camps Bay
South Africa

marcalcock:

Camps Bay

South Africa

glaad:

Monica Jones, a transgender woman of color and activist living in Arizona, was arrested and found guilty by a judge of “manifesting prostitution” because authorities are targeting and profiling trans women. #StandWithMonica!

glaad:

Monica Jones, a transgender woman of color and activist living in Arizona, was arrested and found guilty by a judge of “manifesting prostitution” because authorities are targeting and profiling trans women. #StandWithMonica!

gradientlair:

This is beautiful. [X]

tontonmichel:

Movement

tontonmichel:

Movement

Genuine equality means not treating everyone the same, but attending equally to everyone’s different needs.

Eagleton, Terry, Why Marx Was Right (Yale University Press, 2011) p.5 (via fuckyeahdialectics)

And this is why I get pissed off when.. I talk about equality, and someone says “YOU WANT EVERYONE TO BE THE SAME”.  No, that’s not how it works, and I’m sick of explaining it.

(via cissexuals)

I loved my friend
He went away from me
There’s nothing more to say
The poem ends,
Soft as it began-
I loved my friend.
Langston Hughes (via ethiopienne)

jessica-messica:

donrickles:

As part of my own personal attempt to watch more films made by women, I’ve compiled a list of over 200 films directed by women. I’ve put letters after the films to indicate where they’re easily available to stream. Each film is also a link to an entry on…

Saying things like “we’ve gone from white hoods to business suits” is one way to seem to speak to contemporary racism’s less vocal, yet still insidious nature. But it does a disservice to the public understanding of racism, and in the process undercuts the mission of drawing attention to contemporary racism’s severity.

It wasn’t the KKK that wrote the slave codes. It wasn’t the armed vigilantes who conceived of convict leasing, postemancipation. It wasn’t hooded men who purposefully left black people out of New Deal legislation. Redlining wasn’t conceived at a Klan meeting in rural Georgia. It wasn’t “the real racists” who bulldozed black communities in order to build America’s highway system. The Grand Wizard didn’t run COINTELPRO in order to dismantle the Black Panthers. The men who raped black women hired to clean their homes and care for their children didn’t hide their faces.

The ones in the hoods did commit violent acts of racist terrorism that shouldn’t be overlooked, but they weren’t alone. Everyday citizens participated in and attended lynchings as if they were state fairs, bringing their children and leaving with souvenirs. These spectacles, if not outright endorsed, were silently sanctioned by elected officials and respected members of the community.

It’s easy to focus on the most vicious and dramatic forms of racist violence faced by past generations as the site of “real” racism. If we do, we can also point out the perpetrators of that violence and rightly condemn them for their actions. But we can’t lose sight of the fact that those individuals alone didn’t write America’s racial codes. It’s much harder to talk about how that violence was only reinforcing the system of political, economic and cultural racism that made America possible. That history indicts far more people, both past and present.